Category: Continuum of Care

The Role of Long-Term, Congregate Transitional Housing

This resource examines the role of long-term, congregate transitional housing in ending homelessness. It was developed in collaboration with the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, the departments of Health and Human Services, Housing and Urban Development, Veterans Affairs, and the Office of Violence Against Women at the Department of Justice.

Community Snapshot of New Orleans

This Community Snapshot of New Orleans, Louisiana, provides an overview of the community’s progress on ending veteran homelessness. In early January 2015, New Orleans became the first major U.S. city to announce that it had effectively ended homelessness among veterans.

Preparing for the 2017 Unsheltered Point-in-Time Count

In this recording of a webinar, " Prepare for the 2015 Point-in-Time Count: Unsheltered Count 101," which originally streamed Nov. 3, 2014, speakers discuss the basics of planning and implementing an unsheltered Point-in-Time (PIT) Count. William Snow of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides guidance on federal regulations, and leaders from the Continuums of Care (CoCs) in Las Vegas and Winston-Salem, N.C., share their most effective unsheltered PIT Count strategies.

Continuum of Care Veteran Integration

This webinar, which originally streamed on Wednesday February 26, covers the Department of Veterans' Affairs' (VA) recently released Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) program. Speakers address how "surge" funding represents a huge opportunity for the 78 communities that will receive it and also discuss the current state of the national push to end veteran homelessness and look at good rapid re-housing models.

Community Snapshot of Salt Lake County

This Community Snapshot of of Salt Lake County, UTy, provides an overview of the community’s progress on ending homelessness. In January 2013, Salt Lake County officials, homeless service providers, and volunteers conducted their annual point-in-time count. What they found were only 12 chronically homeless veterans out of 241 chronically homeless individuals and 247 homeless veterans.

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